Tuesday, 12 August 2014

Review Day Tuesday- Of Mice and Men

Tuesday is such a beautiful word. It doesn't matter how you say it or what accent you badly try to mimic- it just sounds nice. And for that reason, Tuesday needs a special purpose. So as of today, 'The Wrong Notes' has 'Review Day Tuesday'!

What I review will vary from week to week. But today, I would like to begin with a book that has had me confused:


Of Mice and Men- John Steinbeck.


Of Mice and Men is a story set in America during the Great Depression. It follows the journey of friends and migrant workers Lennie and George. Lennie is a giant 'softie' with a love of rabbits who worships his companion. George is a small and sensible man who cares for Lennie (who today would probably be diagnosed as having a learning disability).

The story revolves around the difficulties the pairs face whilst on a ranch overcome with the prejudices of 1930's America.


Image sourced from here.

When I initially read this story, I felt kind of under-whelmed. A couple of blokes worked on a ranch, and then it ended (in a way that I won't spoil for those of you who haven't read it). GCSE English, however, had no concern as to my views on the novella, and so it was with some reluctance that I studied every single word.

And now...I genuinely adore 'Of Mice and Men'. There are several reasons for this. Firstly, the characters are so well developed. John Steinbeck had an amazing talent for making the reader feel a prejudiced way, and then un-peeling the characters to make the reader feel bad as their views change.  


Image sourced from here.

Secondly, there are some truly beautiful passages in this book. I mean passages that you just want to read over and over because of how they just feel like words that are meant to be:

“A few miles south of Soledad, the Salinas River drops in close to the hillside bank and runs deep and green. The water is warm too, for it has slipped twinkling over the yellow sands in the sunlight before reaching the narrow pool.”


“As happens sometimes, a moment settled and hovered and remained for much more than a moment. And sound stopped and movement stopped for much, much more than a moment.”


'Of Mice and Men' is a beautifully honest story about the values of friendship and dreams. When read with open eyes, it is a truly wonderful read.

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